Home Blog Page 2

Risque important de cyclogénèse à lEst de lîle dans les prochains jours – Clicanoo

0

Météo France a publié de nouvelles prévisions quant au risque de développement d’une tempête tropicale à l’Est de chez nous : à compter de lundi, le risque de voir naître un système dans cette zone est en effet important, selon le bulletin ZCIT du jour. 

Pour l’instant, Météo France ne donne pas de prévision de trajectoire pour cette potentielle tempête tropicale. La situation reste à suivre dans les prochains jours. 

Lawsuit filed after chickenpox outbreak keeps teen off basketball court – WLWT Cincinnati

0

A Northern Kentucky family is suing their health department because of an issue with the chickenpox vaccine. Bill Kunkel said his son Jerome, 18, is being discriminated against because of his religious beliefs regarding a vaccine for chickenpox.Jerome is a student at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart/Assumption Academy in Walton, Kentucky. “I don’t believe in that vaccine at all and they are trying to push it on us,” Bill Kunkle said. They say the belief is derived from their Christianity. The Health Department said the chickenpox vaccine is the best way to prevent becoming ill and spreading the varicella virus. They said it is very safe and prevents almost all cases of severe illness. Ensure all members of your household are up to date on all vaccinations. The Northern Kentucky Health Department said that all students without proof of vaccination or proof of immunity against chickenpox will not be allowed to attend school until 21 days after the onset of a rash for the last ill student or staff member. In addition, all school events and extracurricular activities involving other schools or the public will continue to be canceled.Jerome Kunkel is a basketball player. He said he was told he couldn’t play sports, but will be allowed to attend school after the required waiting period. “The fact that I can’t finish my senior year in basketball, like, our last couple of games, it’s pretty devastating. I mean, you go through four years of high school playing basketball you look forward to your senior year,” he said.On Friday, a meeting was held at Assumption with parents and school administrators. No one offered any comments to the media.There is a mandatory vaccination program, and there’s an exemption if someone has a religious objection. The attorney representing the Kunkel family said his clients filled out the forms.The school was closed Friday. A court hearing is set for April 1.

A Northern Kentucky family is suing their health department because of an issue with the chickenpox vaccine.

Bill Kunkel said his son Jerome, 18, is being discriminated against because of his religious beliefs regarding a vaccine for chickenpox.

Jerome is a student at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart/Assumption Academy in Walton, Kentucky.

“I don’t believe in that vaccine at all and they are trying to push it on us,” Bill Kunkle said. They say the belief is derived from their Christianity.

The Health Department said the chickenpox vaccine is the best way to prevent becoming ill and spreading the varicella virus. They said it is very safe and prevents almost all cases of severe illness. Ensure all members of your household are up to date on all vaccinations.

The Northern Kentucky Health Department said that all students without proof of vaccination or proof of immunity against chickenpox will not be allowed to attend school until 21 days after the onset of a rash for the last ill student or staff member. In addition, all school events and extracurricular activities involving other schools or the public will continue to be canceled.

Jerome Kunkel is a basketball player. He said he was told he couldn’t play sports, but will be allowed to attend school after the required waiting period.

“The fact that I can’t finish my senior year in basketball, like, our last couple of games, it’s pretty devastating. I mean, you go through four years of high school playing basketball you look forward to your senior year,” he said.

On Friday, a meeting was held at Assumption with parents and school administrators. No one offered any comments to the media.

There is a mandatory vaccination program, and there’s an exemption if someone has a religious objection. The attorney representing the Kunkel family said his clients filled out the forms.

The school was closed Friday. A court hearing is set for April 1.

AlertMe

Traveler potentially exposed people to measles at Treasure Island – News3LV

0

Sorry, Readability was unable to parse this page for content.

Weight loss diet: Man lost over four stone by only eating these five foods – Express

0

The man shared his before and after images to Reddit, then going on to explain exactly what he ate to lose the weight. His weight loss transformation pictures garnered plenty of interest online, with one person immediately asking him to share his “routine and calorie intake”. Responding under the name “u/AyThrowaway0111”, he gave a detailed outline of his day to day meal plan. Starting with breakfast, he said: “My morning is 1 of 2 things. Either a shake (3 cups of spinach, 1 medium banana, 1 cup of unsweetened greek yogurt chobani and 1 cup of unsweetened almond milk) OR 1 sausage egg and cheese mcmuffin from mcdonalds with half of the muffin removed.”

He then went on to detail his lunch options and said: “Lunch is one of these things: Taco Bell Power Menu Bowl with no rice and a soft taco (depending on calorie and carb needs for that day), a prepped meal consisting of 1 can of turkey/chicken, 1 can of black beans no salt added, 1 bag of steam in the microwave broccoli, 1 bag of steamed spinach all put into the same big Tupperware container and seasoned liberally with garlic, onion, salt, pepper and hot sauce.

“The total for that Tupperware container comes to around 870-960 calories. So I split it between lunch and dinner if I go this route.

“The other option is 2 Mcdoubles from Mcdonalds with NO buns for a total of 460 calories. Depending on what I did for breakfast or felt like prepping will determine what I do for lunch.”

Finally, he explained his choices for dinner: “Dinner is the same almost every night. 1 bag of steamed broccoli or spinach, with around 0.8-0.9 pounds of boneless skinless chicken breasts seasoned with the same as the lunch meal I described and roughly half a can of black beans.

“For roughly 745 calories (104g of protein). This should end my day around 1500-1600 calories and then my whey protein shake after the gym puts me right at 1620-1720 to finish the day.”

Other dieters may be surprised he ate fast food and still managed to lose weight, but he explained it all comes down to macros.

He said: “About 35 percent carbs, 25 percent fat and 40 percent protein. Macros are important depending on your needs at the time. On my lifting rest days I drastically reduce the carbs as the instant energy is not needed.”

Exercise also played a part in his transformation, and he wrote: “My routine is work 8-6 ish. Come home cook dinner and maybe a quick prep. Workout from 7:15 to 8:15 and then come home kill my protein shake and then run for about 18-20 mins. Rinse and repeat.

“My off days are not 100 percent do nothing days. I still run every day (unless leg day got me and then I might walk like a duck on the treadmill). I also like to hike or do something outside on these off days to ensure a day is not wasted.”

Giving advice to another poster, he wrote: “Download a calorie tracking app. Focus on your macros and calorie intake. I would suggest fairly low carb to start.

“Get a step tracker. Min of 10k steps a day.Hit the gym and do a good workout. You do not have to over do it. And finally start walking/jogging/running!”

This man is not the only one to lose a large amount of weight and share his journey on Reddit.

One woman lost 67lbs in a year and a half, explaining how she did it on the social site.

She told Reddit users: “The thing that worked the best for me was to cut calories to between 1200 and 1500 per day.”

Sharing her exercise routine, she wrote: “Starting last New Years I began to work out and still go about three times per week mostly for weights.”

She can eat during passing period: How college pressures are causing serious anxiety problems in students – Chicago Tribune

0

For high school students with dreams of reaching top colleges, the pressure to prove they can handle a punishing academic schedule can have devastating effects: Some are hospitalized for academic anxiety and others don’t graduate at all after failing an AP class they weren’t required to take, a suburban high school guidance counselor says.

Students today are acutely aware of how hard it is to get into the best universities, so they’re preparing themselves earlier, many as early as junior high and some even in elementary school. But until they are in over their heads, it can be hard for them to understand how much is too much — causing academic anxiety or extreme stress over their studies — and what their breaking point will be, said Elizabeth Arbir, a guidance counselor at Crystal Lake Central High School in the far northwest suburb.

“Without a doubt, academic anxiety is definitely increasing,” Arbir said in a recent interview. “These kids are setting themselves up for dealing with a lot of pressure. And though some of them will be able to handle it … others are going to be, probably, those same kids who are going to come into my office and have a meltdown.”

Counselors’ experiences are reflected in recent studies of high school students. Rachel Gordon, a sociology professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, recently published research about high school peer groups. One of the biggest changes that separates today’s high school students from past generations is the increased stress and anxiety about their studies and getting into top colleges, Gordon found.

Arbir, who has been a counselor for more than two decades, said there is a fine line between pushing students to master the most academically challenging schedule possible and overscheduling them. Finding the balance can take trial and error, but she most often sees students start high school with wildly ambitious schedules that can lead to suffering emotionally and possibly physically.

“I like all students to reach their full potential, but when my kids start having bad day after bad day, I would say, ‘Look, it’s not worth your well-being here, so let’s lighten your load,’ ” she said.

When Antonette Minniti walked into a sixth period sophomore honors English class at Palatine’s Fremd High School and saw most of the students eating at their desks, the overscheduling she’d cautioned against came into sharp focus.

“It hit me — sophomore year is the first year they’re allowed to remove lunch from their schedule,” said Minniti, a guidance counselor at Fremd. “Colleges love to see the most rigorous schedule you can take, but they want you to be getting As. Some students can handle it and they get really excellent grades, but for other students, sometimes it comes at a cost.”

Arbir said each year its becomes more apparent that eighth-graders think they’ve got to set themselves apart beginning in the first semester of high school. She recently spent an evening with incoming freshmen at an event designed to help the students select their high school classes, something she has done for a number of years. More students than ever — and parents on students’ behalf — ignored her advice that students should build some downtime into the day, such as with homeroom or a study hall, she said.

“It just seemed like in conversation after conversation I’d hear, ‘She’s OK if she doesn’t even have lunch, she can eat during passing period,’ ” Arbir said “…It’s like, push, push, push.”

Arbir’s experience mirrors Gordon’s findings. In studying high school cliques, Gordon found increased anxiety about parents’ expectations worse than in earlier studies of teens, especially in the group of students known as “brains.” Gordon expected the highest-achieving students to be anxious about performance, but she said it was greatly amplified in comparison with the same group in earlier studies.

“Participants identified academic anxiety in more specific terms, even suggesting that students in the ‘brain’ peer crowd were less mentally healthy, due to a fear of upsetting their parents,” said Gordon, who is also a fellow of the Institute for Health Research and Policy at UIC.

Arbir said the students who are most afflicted and debilitated by anxiety often have therapists who they’re seeing outside of school in an attempt to mitigate it.

Katie O’Berry, a senior at Central, where Arbir works, decided to visit a therapist toward the end of her junior year, she said.

“AP tests were coming up, so to cope with all that anxiety and all that stress, I started to go to therapy and it literally has changed my life,” O’Berry said. “Now I know how to deal with all that overwhelming pressure that school kind of gives me.”

O’Berry usually gets up at 6 a.m. and is on campus around 7 a.m. to either attend a club meeting or to seek out a teacher to ask questions. She takes multiple AP classes and is in two clubs: Tiger Buddies, in which she helps students with special needs at fun activities such as going to an arcade or bowling, and Interact Club, a volunteering group that often requires she log hours after school and on weekends. She also is a mentor to several younger students through an organized, school-sanctioned program.

To keep up with her rigorous class load, including AP Physics and AP Calculus, O’Berry often is still doing homework into the early morning. Some days she gets as few as four or five hours of sleep.

“It’s good in the way that it will get us ready for college — but we’re still in high school,” she said.

O’Berry recently was accepted into the University of Colorado at Boulder, where she plans to study infectious diseases. She hopes ultimately to work in a medical research lab. She knows both her schedule and her studies will be more demanding in college and she’ll need the tools she’s picked up in therapy.

Her therapist recommended she try breathing exercises when she notices a spike in anxiety. She also uses two apps to do guided meditation.

“Doing those guided meditations, I can shift the focus from school to somewhere else I’d rather be,” O’Berry said.

She also uses Central’s new Care Room, a space designed for students who need a break.

For Danny Brodson, a senior at Glenbrook North headed to Ohio State University, there’s also pressure to impress friends when sharing news about which school a student is accepted at.

Brodson said it is practically a given for students to post on social media where they plan to attend college. There’s a huge premium placed on large, out-of-state universities such as the University of Wisconsin at Madison, or the University of Michigan. Students who either can’t afford tuition at big schools or want to attend a smaller school might feel reticent to share their plans.

“It’s really sad to think about the student who has just been accepted into their dream school if it isn’t the same type of dream their peers think they should have, the one of the large, party-filled university,” Brodson said. “They chose the school, and it may be small and perfect for that person, but then they have to feel ashamed to share their good news?”

Eric Melton, a guidance counselor from Schaumburg, also said the push toward college for all is creating more stress in high schools.

“Whether you are an upper-middle-class student who is trying continue to ascend or if you are in lower middle class or even below, there’s more pressure from families to get accepted into a university and to go on to college,” Melton said.

With more teens on the college track, schools have become more selective because they’ve got so many more applicants. That stresses students out more because they are constantly searching for ways to stand out, or as Arbir says, “beef up their ‘resumes.’ ”

Minniti, from Fremd, said students there have always been highly competitive, but in recent years she has seen more students allow the college admissions checklist to become the driving force behind their choices on which activities to pursue.

Minniti says school faculty begin talking about such checklists freshman year so students know what is expected, but some students take it to the extreme.

“If it says a college values participation in clubs or sports, they think that means they have to be in every single thing that’s offered,” she said. “I try to tell them just to choose what they are interested in and excel at them, but some of them, it’s like they can’t hear me.”

Minniti said she does her best to tailor her approach to each student she sees struggling with his or her course load and resulting anxiety, noting there isn’t a single approach that will resonate with students. Part of her job is to ask questions about the student’s goals and to offer feedback with possible paths to meet them.

“I don’t want to be a dream-crusher, but I also don’t want them to be like, ‘No one told me getting into Harvard was crazy difficult,’ ” Minniti said.

kdouglas@chicagotribune.com

Twitter @312BreakingNews

State declares measles in Lakewood an outbreak after 3rd case of the highly contagious disease – NJ.com

0

A third confirmed case of measles in Lakewood Friday caused health officials to declare an outbreak of the highly contagious disease.

An unidentified “adult male from Ocean County” visited locations in town including houses of worship, a wedding venue and yeshiva while infected with measles between March 9 and March 14 and may have exposed others, according to the New Jersey Department of Health.

A complete list of all the places the man visited and the times he visited them can be found by clicking here.

The health department asked people who visited any of the Lakewood locations to call their doctor “immediately to discuss potential exposure and risk of developing the illness.”

With three positive cases of measles reported in the last two weeks, the health department has now declared this as the second outbreak in the Lakewood community in the last five months.

The first outbreak sickened 33 people in Ocean and Passaic Counties before it was declared over in January.

State and local health officials were investigating if there were any connection between the recent cases, the previous outbreak in Ocean County, or current outbreaks in other states.

People who have not been vaccinated or have not had measles were at risk of getting the disease, which usually starts with symptoms including fever, coughing and a rash that usually starts on the face.

These symptoms might not develop until as late as April 7 for anyone who was infected by the third man who was recently infected with the disease.

Measles can also cause serious complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis, a swelling of the brain, and can lead to a miscarriage, premature birth or low-birth weight baby for pregnant women, the CDC said.

It can be spread through the air when someone coughs or sneezes and an people can get sick if they come in contact with mucus or saliva from an infected person, officials said.

“We urge everyone to check to make sure they and their family members are up-to-date on measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine and all other age-appropriate immunizations,” state epidemiologist Dr. Christina Tan said in a release. “Getting vaccinated not only protects you, it protects others around you who are too young to get the vaccine or can’t receive it for medical reasons.”

The New Jersey Department of Health also warned on Feb. 26 that a New Jersey resident with measles may have exposed others to measles in Bergen County.

Chris Sheldon may be reached at csheldon@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @chrisrsheldon Find NJ.com on Facebook.

Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

Get the latest updates right in your inbox. Subscribe to NJ.com’s newsletters.

Racism, Poverty And Homophobia Are Still Big Obstacles To Ending HIV : Shots – Health News – NPR

0

Shawn Esco brings his dog Nibbler to a park in Jackson, Miss. He’s was diagnosed with HIV 11 years ago and has stayed healthy, but the same can’t be said of many of the other HIV-positive people in his life.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Shawn Esco brings his dog Nibbler to a park in Jackson, Miss. He’s was diagnosed with HIV 11 years ago and has stayed healthy, but the same can’t be said of many of the other HIV-positive people in his life.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Ending HIV transmission in America within the next decade — a stated goal of the Trump Administration — isn’t a question of coming up with new medication. The medicines to prevent and treat HIV infections already exist.

But the road to eliminating HIV and AIDS runs through the deep South, where racism, poverty, and homophobia can be formidable obstacles to testing and treatment, particularly for black gay men. According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in 2017, more than half the new HIV diagnoses in the U.S. were in Southern states, where gay and bisexual black men make up a disproportionate share of people with HIV.

Shawn Esco lives and works in Jackson, Miss. — a city with one of the highest HIV rates in the country.

Esco remembers the moment he realized he was HIV positive. Eleven years ago, he went to a clinic to get a routine HIV test. Workers there invited him into a private room for the results, and he says he knew — before they even said a word.

“When they opened the door,” Esco says, “there was all this new literature that said ‘HIV this,’ ‘AIDS that.’ And you could tell it was there for me.”

The Supreme Court of Mississippi in Jackson, Miss. The city has one of the highest HIV rates in the United States.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Esco is now 37, and lives in an apartment with an affectionate pit bull named Nibbler. He’s stayed healthy in the time since his diagnosis, but the same can’t be said of many of the other HIV-positive people in his life.

In 2011, after good HIV treatments were available, Esco’s best friend from high school died of AIDS-related causes.

“I was extremely pissed off at him,” Esco says,” Because it could have been avoided. All he had to do was want to live.”

Esco says the death of that friend was the hardest to endure, but not his only loss. One of Esco’s exes also died of an AIDS-related condition. And another friend took his own life after he got his diagnosis — out of fear his family would find out.

A few years ago CDC researchers estimated that, at current infection rates, about half of all black men who have sex with men (and 25 percent of Latino gay and bisexual men) in the U.S. will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime.

In 2011, Esco’s best friend from high school died of AIDS-related causes. One of Esco’s exes also died of an AIDS-related condition. And another friend took his own life after he got his diagnosis — out of fear his family would find out.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

In 2011, Esco’s best friend from high school died of AIDS-related causes. One of Esco’s exes also died of an AIDS-related condition. And another friend took his own life after he got his diagnosis — out of fear his family would find out.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

When Esco considers the possibility of ending the epidemic in the next 10 years, he takes into account issues like homophobia, racism, lack of education and stigma, and is blunt: “Given the way things are now, that’s not going to happen.”

In the South, many gay and bisexual black men don’t know the extent of the HIV problem, he says. And, if they do, they may not have access to the tools to prevent and treat the disease.

These are problems that Dr. Leandro Mena tries to solve. He’s an HIV researcher and clinician, and a professor of population health science at the University of Mississippi. Mena also works with My Brother’s Keeper, a community-based nonprofit working to eliminate health disparities in underserved populations.

“Science has given us the tools to end the HIV epidemic,” Mena points out. “The challenge that we have is that we need to make sure those tools can reach those who actually need it most.”

HIV seems easy to keep in check, he says: There’s a daily pill that can keep someone who is infected with the virus healthy.

But things can get complicated fast if you’re poor.

The memorial grove behind Grace House, in Jackson, Miss., where the ashes of more than 45 former residents now rest. Grace House was once a hospice for people dying of AIDS. Today the organization offers hundreds of people in Jackson financial assistance for housing.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

The memorial grove behind Grace House, in Jackson, Miss., where the ashes of more than 45 former residents now rest. Grace House was once a hospice for people dying of AIDS. Today the organization offers hundreds of people in Jackson financial assistance for housing.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

“What are the chances that you may remember to take a medicine that you have to take every day,” he says, “if, this morning, you wake up and you don’t have electricity or you don’t have any money to feed your family?”

Getting access to good health care of any kind — let alone lifesaving medicine — can be especially difficult for people living in rural parts of the south, Mena says. And Mississippi is the poorest state in the country.

Some people in Mississippi who are living with HIV wind up on the doorstep of Grace House, which was once a hospice for people dying of AIDS. Today the organization offers hundreds of people in Jackson financial assistance for housing, and also provides rooms for a few dozen people facing particularly severe challenges, such as addiction or mental health issues.

The Grace House compound in Jackson consists of a cluster of several homes, with a shared backyard and a garden.

It also includes a memorial grove, where statues of angels stand around the base of a tree, memorializing people whose deaths were AIDS-related.

Catherine Sullivan is executive director of Grace House, a Jackson nonprofit that offers transitional and semi-permanent housing and support services for homeless men and women living with HIV/AIDS and women recovering from substance abuse.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Catherine Sullivan is executive director of Grace House, a Jackson nonprofit that offers transitional and semi-permanent housing and support services for homeless men and women living with HIV/AIDS and women recovering from substance abuse.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Catherine Sullivan, executive director of the organization, says the ashes of more than 45 people have been spread in the grove — “some of whom were with us at Grace House when they died; some of whose families wouldn’t pick them up from the morgue. And so we buried them.”

Just four months ago, a Grace House resident named Donna died of an AIDS-related illness. She had spent her life struggling to live openly as a transgender woman.

Sullivan keeps photos from Donna’s funeral on her phone: Donna lying peacefully in a coffin, impeccably made up, in a long white gown.

“It makes me really sad,” Sullivan says, looking at the photos. “Because, in death, who she was is honored in a way that got lost in life most of the time.”

Jeremy Williams got HIV before there was a daily pill to prevent infection in people who are at high risk. That pill is known as PrEP — pre-exposure prophylaxis. A lot of gay and bisexual men in the South are not on PrEP, doctors say, either because they don’t know it exists, or because they can’t afford it.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Jeremy Williams got HIV before there was a daily pill to prevent infection in people who are at high risk. That pill is known as PrEP — pre-exposure prophylaxis. A lot of gay and bisexual men in the South are not on PrEP, doctors say, either because they don’t know it exists, or because they can’t afford it.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Those sorts of stories are familiar to many at Grace House, where residents now are able to live openly and get access to care.

Jeremy Williams, 32, got HIV from his college boyfriend. Williams grew up in rural Mississippi, where HIV treatment was hard to come by.

“You have to drive like an hour or two or three for quality care,” he says.

Williams got HIV before there was a daily pill to prevent infection in people who are at high risk. That pill is known as PrEP — pre-exposure prophylaxis. A lot of gay and bisexual men in the South are not on PrEP — either because they don’t know it exists, or because they can’t afford it. It can cost up to $1,600 a month without insurance. Mississippi has fought against expanding Medicaid, which could have given more people access to HIV prevention and treatment.

Williams says the cost of treatment was kept in check when he was first diagnosed, because he was on his father’s insurance. “But once I got over a certain age, I couldn’t be on his insurance no more, and I couldn’t afford the treatment,” he says.

Today, a daily HIV treatment pill, paid for by the state-administered AIDS Drug Assistance Program, has made his viral load undetectable. So it’s extremely unlikely that he could infect anyone else.

Dating back to the early 1900s, Farish Street was once an epicenter of black life and commerce in Jackson, Miss.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Dating back to the early 1900s, Farish Street was once an epicenter of black life and commerce in Jackson, Miss.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Williams says there’s another issue that makes it hard for him and many other young gay or bisexual black men to protect their sexual health: He was raised in a church that tried to convert gay people to heterosexuality. Shame was part of his daily life.

“The words that people say, they linger,” Williams says. “They linger on for years. And you just — it was like a repeated broken record over and over again. You know: ‘You’re not good enough.’ ‘You’re never going to have anybody.’ ‘No one is going to love you because you have this disease.’ I was just carrying it, you know, like it’s a garment — like all of my shame and stuff.”

There’s also a lack of specialized HIV/AIDS knowledge among too many doctors in the South, says Sandra Melvin, the chief operating officer at Jackson’s Open Arms Health Clinic, where HIV-positive patients can receive care. She says many physicians in the region don’t know about PrEP. And that goes to a broader issue.

“In some cases, I think the training has something to do with it,” Melvin says. “Medical schools don’t focus on certain things — cultural competence, how to deliver health care in rural areas. Those are all things that I think in medical school need to be a focus for young and upcoming physicians or health care providers.”

Tiffany West, a medical assistant with the Open Arms Mobile Health Clinic, prepares to administer HIV tests to students at Tougaloo College, north of Jackson.

L. Kasimu Harris


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris

Tiffany West, a medical assistant with the Open Arms Mobile Health Clinic, prepares to administer HIV tests to students at Tougaloo College, north of Jackson.

L. Kasimu Harris

Attitudes among Mississippi’s elected leaders are also part of the problem, Melvin believes.

“I think that part of what has to happen in this state is that we have to start electing people who reflect the demographics of our society,” she says.

People working to fight the HIV epidemic in Mississippi point to one recent example of a law that they believe promoted homophobic values that could increase the stigma around HIV. In 2016, the state passed a bill into law that allows doctors to refuse to serve certain patients, based on the doctor’s religious beliefs — even if those beliefs seem to be anti-gay.

While there’s no public evidence yet of a doctor refusing to treat a gay patient, critics of the law fear it could deter many people from seeking health care.

One of the Republican sponsors of the bill, Rep. Dan Eubanks, says those fears are misguided.

Hip-hop plays inside the Open Arms Mobile Health Clinic, as a way to help the students at Tougaloo College feel more comfortable while they await testing for HIV or other STDs.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Hip-hop plays inside the Open Arms Mobile Health Clinic, as a way to help the students at Tougaloo College feel more comfortable while they await testing for HIV or other STDs.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

“I think it’s reaching to try and say that this bill is going to make it worse for people with AIDS, because that was never the intention of the bill,” Eubanks says. “The intention of the bill was to protect people’s First Amendment right to adhere to the tenets of the faith — which is guaranteed in our Constitution.”

Eubanks believes that ending HIV requires education, including education about abstinence and about personal responsibility.

“If you know that participating in unprotected sex is dangerous, but yet you do nothing to try and alleviate that, you greatly increased your odds and chances of contracting a disease,” Eubanks says. “So there’s a certain amount of personal responsibility — and that has nothing to do with sexual preference.”

The Open Arms Health Care clinic operates a mobile clinic that visits college campuses so students can get tested for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

DeAndré Steward, 20, showed up for the clinic when it came to Tougaloo University, outside of Jackson. Steward is black and gay, and he’s aware of the soaring infection rates in his demographic.

“It is honestly very scary,” Steward says. “We’re all sexual creatures, so we’re going to have sex.”

Gerald Gibson (left), manager of the Open Arms Mobile Health Clinic talks with Javier Heniquez, a student at Tougaloo College, as he leaves the clinic.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR


hide caption

toggle caption

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Gerald Gibson (left), manager of the Open Arms Mobile Health Clinic talks with Javier Heniquez, a student at Tougaloo College, as he leaves the clinic.

L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Condoms are cheaper than PrEP, and also effective at preventing HIV transmission. Steward knows this but he also knows another reality.

“You need to always use protection,” he says. “But people don’t, which is why they’re scared half to death when they’re going to get tested.”

Steward faces many of the same challenges that Esco and Williams do, but he’s from a younger generation. When asked whether he thinks the HIV epidemic can become a thing of the past, he’s optimistic.

“Absolutely,” he says. “The older generations, they still weren’t as educated on AIDS as they should have been. You know, their minds aren’t that open — our generation’s minds are.”

Steward tested negative for HIV at the clinic, and he plans to stay that way. But one of the best ways to do so would be to get on PrEP. He’d like to do so, he says, but it costs too much.

Editor’s note: In the audio version of this story, which first aired Feb. 14, Jeremy Williams’ last name was not used at his request. He has since decided he is comfortable having NPR using his full name and photograph for this digital version.

Cholesterol Redux: As Eggs Make A Comeback, New Questions About Health Risks – NPR

0

A study finds that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet.

Westend61/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Westend61/Getty Images

A study finds that consuming two eggs per day was linked to a 27 percent higher risk of developing heart disease. But many experts say this new finding is no justification to drop eggs from your diet.

Westend61/Getty Images

Eggs have made a big comeback. Americans now consume an estimated 280 eggs per person, per year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And that’s a significant increase compared with a decade ago.

Part of the renewed appeal stems from the dietary advice we got back in 2016. That’s when the U.S. Dietary Guidelines dropped a longstanding recommended limit on dietary cholesterol. The move was seen as a green-light to eat eggs.

But a new study published in the medical journal JAMA re-opens a longstanding debate about the risks tied to consuming too much dietary cholesterol.

“What we found in this study was that if you consumed two eggs per day, there was a 27 percent increased risk of developing heart disease,” says researcher Norrina Allen, an associate professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University.

“It was surprising,” Allen says.

The researchers behind the JAMA study tracked the health of about 30,000 adults enrolled in long-term studies. On average, participants were followed for about 17 years.

Prior studies have come to competing conclusions. But overall, there has not been strong evidence that limiting consumption of cholesterol-rich foods lowers the amount of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol that ends up in our blood.

Nutrition experts at the Harvard School of Public Health conclude that dietary cholesterol and cholesterol in the blood are only weakly related. But Norrina Allen says that “we don’t know as much as we’d like to about how the cholesterol you consume in your diet is translated into the blood.”

The new study is an observational study, so it doesn’t prove that cholesterol caused the increased risk of heart disease that the researchers documented. “These new findings provide one piece of evidence,” Allen says. But it’s possible that other lifestyle or dietary habits may be responsible for the increased risk.

One shortcoming of the study is that participants were asked only one time about their diets. So, this one snapshot may not have accurately captured their eating habits over time. “We hope that in future studies we can look at how changes in diet over the long-term may be impacting this risk for heart disease,” Allen says. Future studies could also explore how the risks linked to dietary cholesterol may vary from person to person.

Big picture: Many experts say this study is no justification to drop eggs from your diet.

“So much data have already been published on this topic, which generally show that low-to-moderate egg consumption (no more than one egg per day) is not associated with increased risk of heart attack or stroke,” Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said in an email.

Hu says that when it comes to healthful eating, the best strategy is to focus on a well-rounded diet that includes a variety of foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds.

Thomas Sherman, a professor at Georgetown University School of Medicine, agrees. “I tell my students that eating a protein-rich breakfast is one of the best ways of preventing getting hungry,” Sherman says. “So I’d hate for them to come back to me and say, ‘Oh, no! We’re not supposed to be eating eggs.’ “

Sherman says if you’re in the habit of eating a healthy diet, full of lots of plant-based, fiber-rich foods, then “eggs are a welcome part of the diet.” Just don’t overdo it.

But the findings may re-open the debate about whether to reinstate a recommended limit on dietary cholesterol. A committee of experts was named earlier this year to begin the process of revising the U.S. Dietary Guidelines. And Norrina Allen says, “I do think that guideline committees will have to take the evidence [from this study] into account when they’re trying to understand what a healthy — or a moderate — amount of cholesterol would be.”

Harvard-Westlake students were vaccinated. Dozens caught whooping cough anyway – Los Angeles Times

0

Under California law, children must receive all of their doses of whooping cough vaccine to be allowed to attend school, unless they have a medical reason not to be vaccinated. By the time they turn 6, most children have received five doses of the diphtheria-tetanus-acellular-pertussis vaccine, or DTaP. Then they must get a booster before entering seventh grade.

Ticks are dangerous and disgusting. Pennsylvania is in the midst of a 5-year look at diseases they spread. – lehighvalleylive.com

0

Pennsylvania is working to get a handle on ticks and tickborne illnesses like Lyme disease, that pose a threat to public health to the Lehigh Valley and beyond.

Since July 2018, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has coordinated with county governments on a five-year effort to assess the risk of tickborne illnesses across the state. The environmental surveillance program stems from a recommendation from the PA Lyme Disease Task Force.

“Lyme disease is a major public health concern in Pennsylvania,” Pennsylvania Health Secretary Rachel Levine said in a statement. “Many people believe that Lyme disease, and the ticks that carry the disease, can only be found in wooded areas. These surveillance efforts will help us to share with all Pennsylvanians the importance of taking steps to protect yourself,” she added.

This survey is occurring in every county in Pennsylvania as a way to analyze ticks and their habitats, life states and peak activity levels. Lehigh and Northampton counties are among 38 counties that are also part of specific surveys of nymphal blacklegged ticks.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health is funding the study.

The ticks will be collected using white felt drags, which sample low-lying ground cover and understory vegetation for ticks. One goal is to better alert the public about how to avoid tick-infested areas and their potentially debilitating diseases.

This spring and summer, the survey will be taken from May through August, once per week at two different sampling locations, which can be parks, playgrounds, recreational fields or other domestic habitat (with landowner permission), according to the DEP.

Ticks collected are immediately placed in a 70-80 percent alcohol solution, labeled and sent to the DEP.

“Lyme disease affects thousands of Pennsylvanians every year, but ticks are also known to carry other pathogens that could infect humans,” DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell said in a statement. “This survey will provide important data that will help us better understand these arachnids in our environment and inform Pennsylvanians on how, when and where to avoid getting bitten by a disease-carrying tick.”

Here is more from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on avoiding ticks and tickborne illness like Lyme disease:

Find lehighvalleylive.com on Facebook.